Dr. Carryl Baldwin

Dr. Carryl Baldwin

Dr. Carryl Baldwin

Associate Professor, Human Factors and Applied Cognition Program, George Mason University |

“Auditory Displays to Facilitate Attention Management in Highly Autonomous Systems”

Two recent crashes in January 2018 involving Tesla’s Model S, underscore the importance of the need for driver’s to maintain awareness in semi-automated vehicles, even when the autopilot is engaged. Despite manufacturer’s warnings and cautionary statements in owner’s manuals, decades of research in vigilance indicates that this will be a challenge, if not impossible for most drivers. This talk will focus on our recent and on-going research developing novel methods of assisting the driver with attention management in highly autonomous systems. Included in this discussion will be a discussion of the methods to develop and validate effective auditory collision avoidance alerts, driver state monitoring with low cost physiological sensors, and using specific types of music as a means assisting operators with maintaining sustained attention.

Bio

Dr. Baldwin teaches and conducts research in conjunction with the Human Factors and Applied Cognition program. She has over twenty years of experience investigating human factors issues in mental workload, surface and air transportation and cognitive aging. Her primary research interests are in the area of Applied Auditory Cognition. Much of her work involves the use of neurophysiological measures (i.e., EEG, ERP, EKG, and eye tracking) to examine the effort expended when people perform multiple modality dual tasks as a function of changes in sensory or environmental condition or cognitive aspects of the task. Dr. Baldwin has an active line of externally funded research and is currently working in conjunction with sponsors such as the National Highway Traffic Safety Foundation, Federal Highway Administration, Northrup Grumman, and Lockhead Martin.  Previously she has successfully completed multiple projects for the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation and both NASA Langley and NASA Ames.